Utility of Mobile Apps for Video Conferencing to Follow Patients at Home After Outpatient Surgery

LESS Institute Utility of VC for Patient Follow up

Author Information

Fabio J.R. Pencle1 MB BS, Amala Benny1, Kathleen A. Quijada BS3, Jason A. Seale2 MB BS, Kingsley R. Chin2, MD

  1. Less Exposure Surgery (LES) Society.
  2. Less Exposure Surgery Specialists Institute (LESS Institute).
  3. Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine at Florida International University and Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine at Florida Atlantic University

Study Design

Prospective questionnaire

Background Data

The role of technology in medicine has been limited to patient use in decision making for finding and assessing physicians. Teleconference is real time and live interactive program in which one set of participants are at one or more locations and the other set of participants are at another location. The teleconference allows for interaction, including audio and/or video, and possibly other modalities, between at least two sites. A study by Augestad et al has demonstrated from the literature the use of video conferencing for surgeons and its benefits especially in rural areas. Newer technology has allowed mobile video conferencing with encryption specific to the application or mobile phone. Outpatient surgery has a great opportunity to demonstrate the role of utilizing video conference (VC) in the follow up of patients postoperatively. The authors aim to assess patient’s perception to the use of mobile app for video conference (VC) with surgeon and/or staff.

Methods

Patients who presented to an orthopedic institute were presented with a questionnaire. To determine patient attitudes regarding surgery and the use of mobile VC app, we asked the surveyed participants using a 5 point Likert scale. Consenting patients completed a questionnaire of 10 questions prior to being assessed by surgeon in order to minimize any bias resulting from evaluation and treatment. Patients who proceeded to have surgery completed the questionnaire to assess difference in opinion postoperatively.

Results

120 patients completed the questionnaire preoperatively with 58% female population, 71% age younger than 65 years and 67% having a GED/higher education. A total of 36 patients had surgery with 54% female population and 60% age younger than 65 years. All patients had a mobile app for VC with 55% using WhatsApp, 40% using Facetime, 5% Skype and/or other. In person at office with a trained educator was the preferred mode and method for learning about surgical procedures. Eighty-three percent of patients thought that having mobile video app access suggested that their surgeon was more caring preop compared to 89% post op. Overall; four patients contacted the surgeon directly preoperatively. Post-surgery 5/36 patients (14%) utilized video conference to the surgeon directly, 24 patients contacted the concierge team with video conference.

Conclusion

With advances in technology, the use of mobile video conferencing adds a new forum for communication with patients. In the outpatient surgical setting this forum would improve patient-physician relations.

About Author Dr. Kingsley R. Chin

Postoperative Cervical Haematoma Complicated by Ipsilateral Carotid Thrombosis and Aphasia After Anterior Cervical Fusion: a Case Report
Dr. Kingsley R. Chin, Founder of philosophy and practice of The LES Society and The LESS Institute

Dr. Kingsley R. Chin is a board-certified Harvard-trained Orthopedic Spine Surgeon and Professor with copious business and information technology exposure. He sees a niche opportunity where medicine, business and info. tech meet – and is uniquely educated at the intersection of these three professions. He has experience as Professor of Clinical Biomedical Sciences & Admissions Committee Member at the Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine at Florida Atlantic University, Professor of Clinical Orthopedic Surgery at the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine at Florida International University, Assistant Professor of Orthopaedics at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, Visiting Spine Surgeon & Professor at the University of the West Indies, Mona, and Adjunct Professor of Clinical Biomedical Sciences at the University of Technology, Jamaica.

Learn more about Dr. Chin here and connect via LinkedIn.

About Less Exposure Surgery

Less Exposure Surgery (LES) is based on a new philosophy of performing surgery, leading the charge to prove through bench and clinical outcomes research that LES treatment options are the best solutions – to lowering the cost of healthcare, improving outcomes and increasing patient satisfaction. Learn more at LESSociety.org.

The LES Society philosophy: “Tailor treatment to the individual aiding in the quickest recovery and return to a pain-free lifestyle, using LES® techniques that lessen exposure, preserve unoffending anatomy and utilize new technologies which are safe, easy to adopt and reproducible. These LES®techniques lessen blood loss, surgical time and exposure to radiation and can be safely performed in an outpatient center. Less is more.” – Kingsley R. Chin, MD

About The LESS Institute

The LESS Institute is the world leader center of excellence in Less Exposure Surgery. Our safe, effective outpatient treatments help patients recover quickly, avoid expensive hospital stays and return home to their family the same day. Watch our patient stories, follow us on Facebook and visit TheLESSInstitute.com to learn more.

About SpineFrontier

The above study utilized LES Technology from SpineFrontier – leading provider of LES Technologies and instruments – offering surgeons and patients superior technology and services.

Correspondence

Kingsley R. Chin, MD

Professor of Clinical Orthopedics

Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine at Florida International University

Attending Spine Surgeon

Less Exposure Surgery Specialists Institute (LESS Institute).

3816 Hollywood Blvd, #102 Hollywood FL 33021.

Tel: 954-640-6010 Fax: 855-411-4647 Email: kingsleychin@thelessinstitute.com

Conflicts of interest and sources of funding: We did not seek or receive any funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Wellcome Trust, Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI), or others for this work. KRC is a shareholder in and receives other benefits from SpineFrontier Inc., none of the other authors (FJRP, AB, KAQ and JAS) have any potential conflicts of interest to declare for this work.

Acknowledgements

The authors would like to thank Saily Lopez and the Surgical Education Responsibilities Value and Empathy (S.E.R.V.E) ™ team for their assistance with this project.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *